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Apprenticeships

Why choose an apprenticeship?

Taking a vocational route i.e. an apprenticeship suits those who do not wish to pursue an academic career pathway and are more hands-on, you can work while you learn, and earn while you learn! You can opt to obtain advanced-level qualifications, with many trainees going on to doing degrees as they progress through their career.  What's more, apprentices often have their tuition fees paid for by their employer, and with the costs of university study increasing soon, apprenticeships look like an even more appealing option!

Taking a vocational route to gaining qualifications can hold exciting prospects, apprentices with ambition to enter senior roles within the firm usually find their are few barriers if they have the right skills. In fact many company directors started life on the shop floor.

What are the requirements?

Many apprenticeship programmes are often aimed at 16-24 year-olds and resident in the UK. However, some companies also run Adult Apprenticeship schemes with no age limits, often recruiting candidates from transferable jobs such as the automative industry.

The qualifications you can gain through an apprenticeship are NVQs levels 2 and 3 or a BTEC or City and Guilds qualification. An apprenticeship can last between 12 to 24 months, but it can vary from employer to employer (it is advisable to check this first with individual employers). Most apprenticeships offer time off each week to study at college and companies often have in-house training labs as well as working with colleges equipped with the latest technology.

Manufacturing or Maintenance or Pilot?

In aerospace, apprenticeships are offered either by aircraft component manufacturers, such as BAE Systems, Airbus, Rolls-Royce, Messier-Dowty, Goodrich or by aircraft maintenance providers, which could be an airline such as Flybe, British Airways or Virgin Atlantic or a specialist aircraft maintenance company e.g. Monarch Aircraft Engineering, ATC Lasham or Hawker Pacific.

In manufacturing, you will learn how to build the highly complex parts and systems that make up the aircraft components. In maintenance, you wil learn how to inspect, repair and maintain aircraft parts and systems often to Licensed Engineer standards.

For aspiring pilots, a new Higher Apprenticeship in Professional Aviation Pilot Practice (HAPAPP) was launched in Spring 2013.  Updates on this pathway will be included in these webpages and on the Aviation Skills Partnership Network which you can join to access the latest aviation skills information.  
Also check out the Flying Links page on this website to give you ideas and more information on aviation careers.

What do I need to do?

To find out about apprenticeship opportunities you can contact companies directly and find out whether they are taking on any apprentices  or have any future opportunities coming up.  Sometimes it can be hard knowing where to start, but knowing what area of the industry is the first step.

Alternatively you can contact your local Connexions service to find out whether they hold a list of local employers that are offering apprenticeships. You can also contact your local FE College and local privately-run vocational training colleges to see if they are also working with employers locally on apprenticeships. Talk also to the National Apprenticeship Service for more information about Apprenticeships and the support you can receive from Government.

The websites below also have useful apprenticeship information:  
Engineering and Manufacturing - www.apprentices.co.uk 
National Apprenticeship Service - www.apprenticeships.org.uk 
NotgoingtoUni website - http://www.notgoingtouni.co.uk/

 

Ballantyne Careers Awareness event 2014

Our annual event for 14-18 year-olds is on 23 April 2014, London W1. Find out more here (external link)

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